Unfortunately, Hurricane Florence is developing according to the same scenario that Unknowncountry has been warning about since the publication of Whitley Strieber and Art Bell’s book Superstorm in 1999. Katrina, Sandy, Harvey and now Florence have all come into contact with unusually warm inshore waters, causing them to strengthen dangerously as they moved onshore. Addiing to this problem, the storms have been slow moving due to the general decline in air circulation and the weight of the water vapor in these very large cloud masses.
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Tropical Storm Florence, presently circulating in the south-central Atlantic Ocean, may move north and east and make landfall somewhere along the US East Coast later this week. If the storm reaches this area of the ocean, unsually warm water will cause it to increase rapidly in strength. This is the same effect that has been present in the Gulf of Mexico since the early part of this century.
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Today I was with old friends Catherine and George Cisneros of Urban15 in San Antonio, discussing the changing environment and the future of man. It was an important conversation, and I want to memorialize it here in my journal.
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It mightn’t be quite a case of the flapping of a Brazilian butterfly’s wings causing a tornado in Texas, but a team of climate researchers has found a correlation between melting Arctic sea ice and the formation of tornadoes in the United States, with fewer tornadoes being reported when northern sea ice is unseasonably low.

"A relationship between Arctic sea ice and tornadoes in the US may seem unlikely," says study co-author Jeff Trapp, an atmospheric sciences researcher with the University of Illinois at Urbana. "But it is hard to ignore the mounting evidence in support of the connection."
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