Two new climatological studies are warning about the potential for a scenario similar to what was depicted in Whitley Strieber and Art Bell’s book ‘The Coming Global Superstorm’. Both studies investigate the potential impact of freshwater from melting ice from the Arctic and Greenland: one focusing on the potential future impacts, and the other, how the deep past was affected by the same conditions.

The first study, from the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany, used computer modeling to determine the effect that a rapid thaw of Greenland’s glaciers, of which would dump massive amounts of fresh water into the North Atlantic, would affect the Atlantic’s currents.
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While the effects of climate change have been felt in different ways around the globe, the polar regions have been subject to outright changes to their respective topographies, as ice acts as a major feature of their landscapes. Scientists are concerned about the impact of these changes on Arctic wildlife, particularly ones that have adapted to depend on ice formations for survival, such as the polar bear.

One effect of the southward push of the habitat of the polar bear is that they are cross-breeding with grizzly bears, producing a hybrid called "pizzly bears". While encounters with the hybrid pizzly have been documented in the past, there are increasing reports of sightings of these odd ursids.
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Unknowncountry’s Climate Watch is predicting a wet winter in 2015-2016 for the Northern Hemisphere, with warmer temperatures and significant snowfall above the 39th Parallel. Below that parallel, flooding is probable in the US and Mexico as a strong el Nino moves eastward and northward. Assuming that trade winds decline normally, flooding will also extend across the drought-stricken US west coast. Drought conditions will intensify in South and Central America, however, and a hot Austral summer is likely. If the trade winds remain strong, the drought will continue in the western US, and el Nino will affect the central and eastern portions of the continental land mass more strongly.
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July was the 365th consecutive month of above average temperatures on planet Earth, and the hottest month since record keeping began in 1880. According to paleoclimatologists, it may have been the hottest month since the Bronze Age 4,000 years ago. The reason for the extraordinary and rapid heating that is taking place worldwide is that the oceans are no longer absorbing heat and are instead themselves warming to record levels. In addition, substantial increases in methane emissions across the arctic are contributing to record arctic heating and reducing atmospheric circulation, especially in the northern hemisphere.
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