New studies have been coming to light that say that the apparent pause in the increase in ocean temperatures between 1998 and 2014 may never have happened to begin with, with the revised data instead showing a steady increase through that period.

According to a NOAA study that was released last year, the discrepancy came about due to the use of ship-based temperature readings, as opposed to temperatures recorded by ocean buoys. Buoys have a tendency to report lower temperatures than their ship-based counterparts, and are more accurate and consistent in their readings. In the 1990s, most readings were taken from ships, but now 85 percent of temperature readings are now provided by buoy-based sensors.
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The National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration has released its annual Arctic Report Card, assessing the state of the climate above 60º north, and region’s grades are not good: higher temperatures, lower snow and ice cover, and alarming biological activity marred the report’s findings.
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Global sea level rise has been assumed to have been rising at an average rate of 1.5 centimeters (0.6 inches) per decade since 1900, as measured by NOAA. However, a new study has cast that figure into doubt: after having taken regional sea level increases into account, the previously accepted rate may be off by a great deal — from 5 to 28 percent in some regions.

The problem comes from the fact that sea level measurements have been historically taken from coastal tide gauges, from roughly a dozen select sites around the northern hemisphere. It was assumed in the past that ocean levels were rising relatively evenly across the globe, however:
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