On August 1, China launched their Quantum Experiments at Space Scale (QUESS) satellite from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in the Gobi Desert. This satellite, a joint Austrian-Chinese collaboration, is intended to facilitate long-distance experiments in quantum optics, to allow the development of secure quantum-encryption communications and quantum information teleportation technology. On August 19, Beijing’s control center successfully received 202 megabytes of data from the satellite, nicknamed Micius after the 5th century Chinese scholar, secured using quantum encryption keys.
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While it probably wouldn’t have to do with Star Trek’s 70th anniversary, researchers that are part of a state-backed strategic development program in Russia say they plan to develop a quantum-based teleportation device within the next 20 years.

While such a miraculous device might sound like it’s a long way from being developed, Russian tech-sector investor Alexander Galitsky points to recent breakthroughs in quantum teleportation that hint that what is being done at the molecular level might one day be applied to the macroscopic. "It sounds fantastical today, but there have been successful experiments at Stanford at the molecular level. Much of the tech we have today was drawn from science fiction films 20 years ago."
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A team of physicists have put forward an ambitious new plan to put the principle of quantum superposition, where an object can exist in two places at once, to work on a subject that has not been attempted before: they plan on doing this with a living microorganism.

Researchers have been steadily increasing the scale of the subject that they subject to a state of quantum superposition, where the particles affected are in more than one place at the same time, starting with smaller elementary particles such as photons, up through recent experiments where macroscopic, inanimate objects have been subjected to this state.

But what about living organisms?
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Traveling for some is a pleasure but there are times, such as during the daily commute, when getting from A to B is just a tedious and often laborious necessity.

We look with envy at our futuristic cartoon and film heroes who simply teleport from place to place, disappearing in one location and appearing just seconds later at their desired destination. This novel idea, once thought to be rooted firmly in the imagination of science-fiction authors, may be one step closer to becoming a reality.
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