NASA has announced that they have confirmation that Saturn’s moon Enceladus has a food source that could support potential microbial lifeforms. This crucial ingredient accompanies Enceladus’ grocery list of elements needed to support life: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, organic molecules, and of course, liquid water.

"Almost all of the conditions that astrobiologists have identified for habitability are present on Enceladus: water, organics, and a chemical energy source," explains Hunter Waite, from the Southwest Research Institute. "The only things that are left on the checklist are phosphorus or sulfur."
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Four possible candidates for the elusive Planet Nine have been discovered, following an intense, three-day search involving approximately 60,000 amateur astronomers, coordinated through a Zooniverse citizen science project by Siding Spring Observatory at Australian National University (ANU). In addition, the participants in the search have classified more than four million other objects.

"With the help of tens of thousands of dedicated volunteers sifting through hundreds of thousands of images taken by SkyMapper, we have achieved four years of scientific analysis in under three days," remarks ANU researcher Brad Tucker.
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It turns out that Tabby’s Star — the star that has been hypothesized to have an alien megastructure around it — is not alone when it comes to wild fluctuations in its light output. Astronomers at Germany’s Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics have found yet another star that experiences its own drops in brightness, although this one may offer a clue as to why it appears to periodically flicker out.
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The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence program is currently investigating a high-energy signal burst that originated from a star 95 light years away, in the constellation Hercules. SETI senior astronomer Seth Shostak cautions that this is unlikely to be an artificial signal, as there are a number of natural phenomena that could also have produced the signal.

The signal was recorded by Russian astronomers at the RATAN-600 radio telescope in Zelenchukskaya. Unfortunately, the signal was recorded on May 15, 2015, nearly a year and a half ago, a delay that severely hampers verification of the other signal from other telescopes. Nonetheless, SETI will be listening to the star on the off chance that there might be a repeat of the signal.
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