We’re all familiar with the concept of parallel realities: universes much like our own, but impossibly out of reach when it comes to communicating with them—or at least so it would seem. A series of experiments has been scheduled to be run this summer to see if a mere handfulread more

Quantum researchers have managed to simulate the reversal of time at the quantum scale, using IBM’s quantum computers. Although the effect is simulated, the implication of this experiment is that the arrow of time doesn’t necessarily have to flow in one direction, but can be reversed, allowing what once wasread more

President Donald J. Trump has announced that he has ordered the formation of a sixth branch of the U.S. military, adding the "Space Force" to the Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marines, and Navy. Trump made the announcement at a meeting of the National Space Council on June 18, saying that "It is not enough to merely have an American presence in space, we must have American dominance in space." According to Trump, the Department of Defense and Pentagon would "immediately begin the process necessary to establish a space force as the sixth branch of the armed forces… We are going to have the Air Force and we are going to have the space force, separate but equal…"

The subject of time travel has intrigued both scientists and science-fiction writers alike for centuries, but now scientists are suggesting that the concept is theoretically sound.

Back in September of this year, UK physicist, Professor Brian Cox, declared that time travel was certainly possible, but only to the future and not to the past.

"The central question is, can you build a time machine? The answer is yes, you can go into the future," the University of Manchester professor told the audience during a speech given at the British Science Festival. "You’ve got almost total freedom of movement in the future."