Archeologists who dug up the remains of a Bronze Age archer at Stonehenge last year have found the remains of four adults and two children nearby. They came from Switzerland and may have been involved in building Stonehenge, in the area where crop circles are the most frequent and the most complex.

The group of people is believed to have lived around 2300 BC, during the building of Stonehenge. Archeologist Andrew Fitzpatrick says, “This new find is really unusual. It is exceptionally rare to find the remains of so many people in one grave like this in southern England. The grave is fascinating because we are seeing the moment when Britain was moving from the Stone Age into the Bronze Age, around 2300 BC.”
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The reason Stonehenge was built 4,800 years ago remains mysterious. Archeologists have speculated that it was a place of worship or an early calendar. But a gynecologist thinks its design may be based on female genitalia. Gynecologist Anthony Perks first got the idea after noticing how the inner stones are arranged more in an egg-shaped pattern than a true circle. When he compared the layout with the shape of female sexual organs, he found surprising parallels.
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The famous prehistoric construction of Stonehenge in the U.K. is fascinating because, like many other megalithic structures, no one knows exactly how or why it was built. It’s in the part of Great Britain that has become famous for elaborate crop circles every spring, meaning it might be the site of some sort of Earth energy. Archeologists now think it may have been commissioned by the early Swiss or Germans, because they’ve found a 4,000-year-old grave of a wealthy archer from the Alps nearby who was from the area that is now modern Switzerland, Austria or Germany.
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The recent eclipse has revealed that a puzzling medieval site in Africa is actually an astronomical observatory. The main part of the mysterious construction known as Great Zimbabwe is called the Great Enclosure, which was built in 1200 AD and is made up of over 16,000 cubic feet of stone. Archaeologists assumed it was once a royal palace. But archaeologist-astronomer Richard Wade has discovered that Great Zimbabwe functions as a calendar based on the heavens, like Stonehenge in England, although it?s not nearly as old.
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