Russian archaeologists believe that they have discoveredanother Stonehenge. The 4,000 year old structure appearssimilar in construction to Stonehenge, and means that theculture that created the famous British site might have beenestablished across a vast area of the world in prehistory.

In addition to the remains of the structure found in theRyazan area, ritual implements have been found that mightshed light on the religious practices and culture of thepeople who built the two monuments. Few such remains havebeen located near Stonehenge in Salisbury, so this findcould have great importance in understanding the mysteriousculture of the henge builders.
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Archaeologists studying prehistoric stone carvings near Scotland have found an amazing carving of a face that is much more sophisticated than the other primitive stone art in the vicinity. The question is, where did it come from?

Rocks with simpler markings on them are thought to have been made thousands of years ago by Neolithic and Early Bronze Age people. The “face” could be much younger?perhaps only a few hundred years old. But then what is it doing in the midst of so much prehistoric art?
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Ley Lines are magnetic lines that criss-cross the Earth. Early humans may have been able to detect them, since many prehistoric monuments, such as Stonehenge, are built along them. Migratory birds may be able to see them and use them as a map.

“A fascinating possibility is that [birds] may actually see the earth’s magnetic lines as patterns of color or light intensity superimposed on their visual surroundings,” says biologist John B. Phillips. “Some animals can see ultraviolet light. Some animals can see polarized light.” It’s now known that bees can see “landing strip” patterns on flowers that are invisible to human eyes.
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Wallace T. Wallington has figured out how ancient civilizations like the Egyptians moved giant blocks of stone before they discovered the wheel. He says, “It’s more technique than it is technology. I think the ancient Egyptians and Britons knew this.”

Kim Crawford writes in the Flint Journal that Wallington has several 10 ton blocks in the yard of his rural home that he’s learned to move with wooden levers. Last October, the Discovery Channel recorded him raising a 16-foot concrete block that weighed 19,200 pounds and setting it into a hole, in the same way ancient builders probably created Stonehenge. He now has a 10 foot high column in his yard. He says, “I call it the forgotten technology.”
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