Researchers believe they have discovered the cause behind a mysterious, yet beautiful, aurora-like phenomenon named STEVE. Their findings confirm that STEVE is not only a phenomenon distinct from the more familiar Aurora borealis and Aurora australis that extend from the Earth’s Arctic and Antarctic regions, respectively, but also that STEVEread more

Early last year, a little-regarded atmospheric phenomenon gained the attention of researchers when citizen scientists drew attention to it on social media: Giving it the highly-scientific name of "Steve", this luminous purple ribbon that occasionally streaks across the sky is a fast-moving stream of hot gases that occurs high in the atmosphere. Initially assumed to be part of the aurora borealis, a recent study of the phenomenon has found that it has nothing to do with the display of charged particles that light up the polar atmosphere — so, just what is Steve?
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The aurora borealis is appearing across the country, as far south as California and Georgia. If you look up in the sky, you?re likely to see a shimmering display of red and green lights. The colorful streaks, also known as the Northern Lights, are rarely seen south of Canada and Alaska.

They could be seen on Monday night beginning around 8:50 p.m. EST, as broad blue and green spiked bands, tinged with brilliant red areas. The sky was ?almost like a fluorescent red,? according to Rick Anderson in West Virginia. ?What was really awesome was I looked through my back yard, where I could see the horizon, and it looked like rays coming from the ground up into the sky,? he says.
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