It’s Thanksgiving in the US, and for the rest of the world it is never a bad time to give thanks for all of our blessings.
There are many who count vaccines as one of the major blessings of the modern age, as they allegedly save thousands from the threat of harmful diseases.

Yet our confidence in the effectiveness of vaccines is apparently waning; in a survey conducted by the University of Michigan, 74 per cent of American parents said they would remove their vaccinated children from a day-care centre if there was a possibility that they would encounter non-vaccinated children.

The link between autism and the Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR) has been proposed for years, but has always been emphatically denied by the medical profession.

Many previously healthy children appeared to have developed Autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, verbal and non-verbal communication, shortly after receiving the controversial vaccine, causing serious questions to be asked of organisations such as the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); however they have always maintained that the link is unfounded.