An analysis of 29 prehistoric footprints found on the west coast of Canada have revealed that they are 13,000 years old, making them the oldest known footprints in North America. While older archeological remains have been uncovered elsewhere on the continent, this find adds to the body of evidence that modern humans were present on North America’s west coast well before the end of the last Ice Age, in this case over 2,500 years before the current geological era, the Holocene, began.
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Archaeological sites in India and Israel have yielded new finds that once again illustrate the probability that some groups of people left Africa much earlier than previously assumed. Although a number of these migrations have been found to have occurred throughout humanity’s early history, the earliest movement was assumed to have taken place between 130,000, and 115,000 years ago.  Two new discoveries from India, and Israel may point to an even earlier beginning to the nomadic culture of the walking people, one that might very well have taken place more than 385,000 years ago.
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Adding to a recent string of discoveries that are rewriting the narrative of human evolution, fossils of a number of ancient human individuals that were unearthed in Morocco have been dated to more than 300,000 years ago. this find pushes evidence for the age of Homo sapiens back by roughly 100,000 years, and also shows that our ancient ancestors were much better traveled than previously assumed.
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