?but that ones that DO occur will be more powerful – A surprising study shows that in the future, when the world is warmer, there will be fewer hurricanes like the terrible cyclone that devastated Myanmar?NOT more. This is because earth is heating up with such unexpected speed that the heat is reaching the stratosphere far faster than expected.

This means that there will be less of a temperature difference between the lower and upper atmosphere, and it is this difference that creates storms. Unfortunately, it is also what drives the jet streams, which will become sluggish and then stop if the heating continues. Without jet streams to clear the air, many large cities will quickly become unlivable.
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Hurricane season is returning soon, and researchers at the University of Colorado have predicted that there will be four major hurricanes this season. The predictions do not suggest where they might make landfall, but it is expected to be an intense season because of the effect of Pacific cooling caused by the active La Nina formation in the central Pacific, and unusually warm waters in the south Atlantic.

When La Nina conditions exist in the Pacific and the south Atlantic is warm, as it is now, Atlantic hurricanes can be especially strong. The record for hurricane formation is 2005, when 28 tropical storms and hurricanes formed in the Atlantic. Last year, there were 14 tropical storms, six of which became hurricanes.
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Another summer, another series of weather catastrophes worldwide. Monster rains kill hundreds in India, a gigantic area of Siberian permafrost melts, northern Europe floods while southern Europe experiences its worst drought ever recorded.

And now Katrina, which could well turn out to be the greatest environmental disaster in the history of the United States, and a terrifying warning of worse to come. As I write this, the governor of Louisiana is saying that the situation is “worse than our worst fears” and 80 percent of New Orleans is under water.
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