Last November, the Scan Pyramids project unveiled evidence that there is a 30-meter (100-foot) chamber running above the Grand Gallery in the Great Pyramid at Giza. The image of the chamber, produced by muon tomography (basically an x-ray of the pyramid, made using cosmic rays), is unfortunately imprecise, leading to a wide variety of ideas and speculation as to the chamber’s function and what may lie within. One such idea has been put forward by a Italian astrophysicist/archaeoastronomer Giulio Magli, in that it may contain an iron throne for the pharaoh to sit upon, as part of his journey into the afterlife.
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A Canadian physics professor claims that he has uncovered evidence of communication from 234 extraterrestrial civilizations, in the form of signals that are encoded in the emanations of stars much like our own Sun.

In analyzing the composition of the light spectra of 2.5 million stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, optical physics professor Ermanno Borra, of Université Laval in Quebec, found patterns in the form of 1.65 picoseconds pulses (just a little more than a trillionth of a second) that existed in the light of 234 Sun-like stars. Borra posits that only extremely powerful lasers can produce such a rapid pattern, meaning that the signals must be artificial in origin.
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There is an unassuming village in the South-East of England that may have played host to one of the most intriguing potential alien visitations ever recorded.

Woolpit, in Suffolk, is the setting for an ancient legend dating back to the 12th century, which describes an encounter with two strange beings known as "The Green Children of Woolpit."

According to the myth, residents of the village were shocked when the two green-skinned children, a boy and a girl, appeared mysteriously on the edge of a field in Woolpit and were found by reapers working in the fields at harvest time.
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A recent Unknown Country news article outlined the results of a poll in which representatives from the global population were canvassed for their opinions. The poll asked participants which from a list of dangers they considered to be the most likely to threaten continued human existence.

The options given in the poll ranged from nuclear weapons, religious and ethnic hatred, pollution and environmental disasters, economic crisis and disease. Yet, according to an Oxford philosophy professor who has performed extensive research in the field of all such existential threats, the biggest threat to mankind’s future may be "super-intelligence."
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