Italian gynecologist Severino Antinori has announced that that he has successfully impregnated three women with clones and the first one?a boy?will be born in Serbia in January. The Raelians UFO group also claims to have created the first clone and says a woman in its care will give birth to a girl by the end of December. Spokeswoman Brigitte Boisselier says, “We have five pregnancies under way, of which one is almost due.” Two U.S. couples, two Asian couples and one European couple are involved in the Raelians project.
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Here’s a cloning project that everyone will agree should be done: a nonprofit group plans to clone the world’s oldest tree, a 55 foot tall bristlecone pine that?s 4,767 years old and clings to a wind-swept mountain in eastern California. “It has lived at least a millennium longer than any other known tree,” says Forest Service official Larry Payne. The tree, named “Methuselah,” predates Christ by almost 3,000 years.

Edmund Schulman discovered the tree and dated it with by a core sample in the 1950s. However, boring provides only an age estimate, because it?s difficult to count 4,767 tree rings in a core sample from a twisted bristlecone trunk that?s 4 ? feet across. “The only way to determine the exact age is to cut it down,” Payne says.
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Cloned animals have hundreds of abnormal genes, which explains why so many of them die at or before birth, meaning it would be irresponsible to clone a human being. Despite this, there are several human cloning attempts taking place right now.

The process of cloning introduces the genetic mutations, and this seems to be unavoidable. Rudolf Jaenisch of M.I.T. says, “I think this confirms suspicions that I have always had and that many others had that cloning is a very inefficient method at this point. It is very irresponsible to think this method could be used for the reproductive cloning of humans.”
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The FDA has officially announced that cloned animals are safe to eat, but says that products made from genetically-modified animals could be unsafe. They are currently deciding whether to allow the sale of genetically-modified milk. The FDA is worried about how, when and where inserted genes will turn themselves on. New genes inserted into the DNA of genetically-modified animals make proteins which are not normally present in the human diet, and these could produce allergic reactions, or even be poisonous.
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