Tropical storm Irma, presently in the south Atlantic and on a north-northwest course that could take it up the US east coast is forecast to become a hurricane over the weekend. It is not yet known if it will make landfall, but if it does, Florida and the Caribbean are the most likely areas of concern. It is also possible that the storm could move north and menace the US Atlantic Seaboard. Readers in any of these areas should watch this storm carefully as it is growing quickly and is forecast to become a category 2 hurricane and continue to grow from there.

Meanwhile, the hurricane center also identified another storm grouping that could increase in strength and menace Gulf Coast states, including areas of southeastern Texas where Harvey has already caused such epochal flooding, according to the Weather Prediction Center.

Hurricane forecasters gave the disturbance a 20 percent chance of developing over five days. It is expected to be slow to organize.

If it becomes a named storm, it would be Jose. Large numbers of named storms are expected to develop this season because ocean waters are unnaturally warm. They will move slowly because the jet stream has slowed due to the fact that meltwater from Greenland has disrupted the flow of the Gulf Stream on which the wind currents depend for their energy.