This is the time of year when the people in Greenwhich, England figure out what time it really is and adjust the time by a second or two. A sediment mainly made up of algae, which is affected by light and thus “records” the amount of sunlight, indicates that days are longer than they used to be, meaning the rotation of the Earth is slowing down. Astronomers say that during the early years of Earth’s existence, it took only six hours for our planet to make one complete rotation, which was the length of a single day.

Why is Earth slowing down? By melting some of the ice at the poles, global warming could be making Earth?s rotation speed up and our days shorter.

Art credit: http://www.freeimages.co.uk
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If we can speed up time, we may be able to travel in time. Now scientists say they’re learning how to do it. If you find this confusing, you’re not alone: physicist Carlos Dolz says, ”A big problem for science is common sense. It works for most everything in people’s lives, but not in physics.”
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To travel through time, you can open a wormhole in space-time and step through it. All you need is some “exotic matter,” which is repelled, rather than attracted, by gravity. The problem is, no one knows how to make exotic matter. But New Zealand researcher Matt Visser thinks we’ll learn how to make it soon?then we’ll be ready to travel in time. Wormholes are hypothetical tunnels that connect distant parts of space-time. Einstein’s theory of general relativity says they exist, but in order to stay open, they need exotic matter. Quantum theory says that subatomic particles and their antiparticles pop in and out of existence all the time in the vacuum of space. Exotic matter might be created by suppressing this action.
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Von Braschler will be on Dreamland June 1st to tell us how time can be slowed down and even ?frozen? and how athletes, healers and remote viewers have learned how to manipulate time.

According to fundamental laws of physics, time is the 4th dimension. Our minds perceive time as an moving in one direction, from past to future, but this is not necessarily true. Mark K. Anderson reports in wired.com that 50 scientists met in Slovakia for a four-day workshop to explore this issue.

Metod Saniga of the Slovak Academy of Sciences combines mathematical models and pathology reports of schizophrenic, drug-induced and other abnormal perceptions of time. Studying patients with a disjointed sense of time can reveal how it really works.
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