…as we’ll find out what Daylight Saving Time starts on Sunday – It may only be a single hour of lost time, but “springing forward” for Daylight Saving Time, as we will do on Sunday, March 8, can pack a punch for some people. Many experience sleepiness, mood changes and sleep disturbances as they attempt to adjust to the time change.
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?But we don’t need to adjust our clocks – The spin of the Earth is slowing down. Not by much; only about 0.002 seconds a day (it varies), relative to our modern definition of the second. The varying rotation of the Earth is due to the cumulative effect of friction from the ocean’s tides, the moon?s orbital momentum, snow (and the lack thereof) at the polar ice caps, the 23-degree tilt of the earth, the atmosphere, solar wind, space dust and magnetic storms. Because of all these factors, the earth does not rotate EXACTLY one time every 24 hours (or 86,400 seconds).
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On March 9, we all have to remember to set our clocks AHEAD one hour, but our biological clocks may take longer to adjust. And this year was leap year, with a 29th of February. Why do we need leap year anyway?
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When we?re in danger, time seems to slow down. This may bean evolutionaryadaptation that gives us an opportunity to make the rightmoves to save ourselves. But it doesn?t always work?forinstance, scary movies and amusement park rides aren?tenough to produce a sense of time slowing down. So whatcauses it?

Since riding a roller coaster isn?t scary enough to producethe illusion, scientists tried frightening volunteers bydropping them from great heights backwards, with no ropesattached, into a net that helped break their fall. InLiveScience.com, Charles Q. Choi quotes researcher DavidEagleman as saying, “I knew it was perfectly safe, and Ialso knew that it would be the perfect way to make peoplefeel as though an event took much longer than it actually did.”
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