Last night I read a document that turned my blood to ice.

The document I am referring to was created by John Ashcroft last month and presently exists in draft form. It is called the Domestic Security Enhancement Act of 2003. It has thus far been given to only two members of congress that I know of, the Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert, and Vice-President Cheney as President Pro-Tem of the Senate.
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College is supposed to be a place where you can try out radical new ideas and enjoy free speech, but that’s gotten dangerous now that campus police departments are helping federal agents track down terrorists. Many of the 911 terrorists came here on student visas, and Homeland Security wants to find out if there are any more hiding in the stacks, but it’s intimidating to professors, foreign students and everyone who likes to toss around ideas in a good debate. It’s also chilling to students who like to surf the internet for new information, since now your internet travels can be read by the Feds.
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Cities across the country are passing resolutions to counteract new Federal snooping legislation. Oakland, California, is now the 20th city to pass a resolution barring employees, including librarians and policemen, from collaborating with federal officials who try to use their new power to investigate residents.

The Patriot Act was rushed through Congress a month after 911 and many people fear it will fundamentally and permanently restrict Americans’ legal rights, as guaranteed by the Constitution. The act allows the government to secretly monitor political groups, seize library records and tap phones and Internet connections. The federal government says it needs the expanded powers in order to prevent terrorist attacks.
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The FBI is monitoring computer use in at least one public library–and probably in libraries across the country. Bill Olds, a reporter for The Hartford Courant, discovered the Feds have bugged the computers at the Hartford Public Library, in an effort to get leads to terrorist organizations.

The FBI installs special software on the computers that allows them to track your internet use and read your e-mail messages. Members of the public who use the library haven’t been informed about this. And Olds says it’s not just the computers–library book circulation lists are also accessible to the government.
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