The mystery of what’s buried deep in the “money pit” on Oak Island in Nova Scotia may finally have been solved. No one has been able to dig down to the treasure in the deep, booby-trapped hole, despite the fact that millionaires and famous people like FDR have tried. Speculation about what’s down there has included the original manuscripts of Shakespeare and the lost treasure of the Knights Templar.

Steve Proctor writes in the Halifax Herald Limited that after 38 years of searching, Dan Blankenship says he has evidence that the treasure consists of millions of dollars in silver and gold that was left behind by Spanish pirates in the 16th century. He says, “I’ve never spoken publicly before because I didn’t want to have put in this much work and end up being wrong, but in the last six weeks, I’ve been able to confirm all my suspicions and I can say definitively who did it, how they did it and where they did it. But until I get down there, I can’t say exactly what is there.”

Blankenship gave up his contracting business in Miami to devote himself to solving the mystery of Oak Island, which has baffled other searchers for 165 years, ever since the hiding place was first discovered. He’s tried to reach the treasure by drilling tunnels in a series of unusually shaped rocks that are scattered across the island. He now says he’ll be able to bring up the treasure sometime in 2004.

During his research of Oak Island, Blankenship eventually dismissed the pit itself as “an elaborate decoy” and decided the treasure was located in a series of tunnels running deep beneath the other end of the island. He had proof when he came across three holes that once served as air shafts for the tunnels, which he located from measurements he took from the position of huge, oddly shaped stones that form the shape of a giant cross. More evidence came when stone carvings were recently discovered by a Norwegian exploration team.

But will Blankenship be allowed to dig? All exploration on Oak Island requires a license and all licenses expired in July. The province is entitled to one-tenth of the find. Besides, Blankenship, 4 other groups have applied for new, 5-year permits. Will one of them get to the treasure first?

Blankenship says, “I turned 80 in May and won’t get another chance. If they give [someone else] a license for property he’s never been interested in, it will be a very sad day.”

All mysteries would be made clear if we could predict the future. Learn how Nostradamusdid it on this week’s Dreamland.Subscribers: Hear John Hogue?s predictions for 2004?he’ll also discuss whether his past New Year’s predictions came true. Non-subscribers can hear the first 10 minutes by clicking “Listen Now” on our masthead.

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