When Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 disappeared without a trace in March, Whitley Strieber’s Journal predicted that, rather than being the end of the story, this event could herald the beginning of a terror attack.

Now, as the mystery begins to unfold, new evidence has come to light that suggests Whitley’s prediction could indeed come true.

It transpires that the plane’s captain, Zaharie Shah, had planned a route to a remote Indian Ocean island on a personal flight simulator at his home; the route had then been deleted but was recovered by investigators who have been exploring all possible leads since the plane’s disappearance three months ago. Detectives raided Capt Zaharie’s home in Kuala Lumpur and siezed his flight simulator and other personal effects when tracking information from the British Inmarsat satellite company indicated the flight had not plummeted into the South China Sea near Vietnam as first thought but had doubled back across the Malay Peninsula, heading left towards the southern Indian Ocean.

The weight of evidence against the captain is mounting, as it appears that, unlike any of the other airline crew, he had made no future plans in his diary, either personal or professional, suggesting that he knew he would not be returning after the flight.

US-based specialist Robert Mark, a pilot and editor of Aviation International News Safety magazine, said yesterday: “This certainly points a few fingers at the captain.”

Rumours of undisclosed "sealed evidence" circulated weeks after the plane went missing fuelling theories of conspiracy and cover-ups, and the latest news, leaked by aviation industry sources and officials in south-east Asia, has left the public wondering if the authorities know that the plane was deliberately hijacked.

The Malaysian government deliberately concealed the captain’s association with Anwar Ibrahim, the country’s main opposition leader who was jailed on charges of homosexual behavior just hours before the plane took off.

Despite the implications of the new information, until the plane is found we can only speculate about whether Captain Zaharie has any involvement in the flight’s bizarre and troubling disappearance.
Or is the new information a "red herring" to distract the public from the plane’s even more disturbing fate? What that fate may be remains to be seen; until then, we can only continue to pray for the 239 souls who were lost along with flight MH370.

Read Whitley Strieber’s latest journal entry that describes the potentially grave danger of this situation.