News Stories

Asteroids Collide

Not with the Earth, but with EACH OTHER - X marks the spot: Asteroid impacts have wreaked havoc on this planet in the distant past (as well as probably bringing life here in the first place), but now that we have modern space telescopes, we can see two asteroids colliding with EACH OTHER. Should this worry us?

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has observed a mysterious X-shaped debris pattern and trailing streamers of dust that suggest a head-on collision between two asteroids. Astronomers have long thought the asteroid belt is being ground down through collisions, but such a smashup has never been seen before.

Astronomer David Jewitt says, "This is quite different from the smooth dust envelopes of normal comets. The filaments are made of dust and gravel, presumably recently thrown out of the nucleus. Some are swept back by radiation pressure from sunlight to create straight dust streaks. Embedded in the filaments are co-moving blobs of dust that likely originated from tiny unseen parent bodies. If this interpretation is correct, two small and previously unknown asteroids recently collided, creating a shower of debris that is being swept back into a tail from the collision site by the pressure of sunlight."

Scientists say that a meteorite that crashed into Earth 40 years ago contains millions of different carbon-containing, or organic, molecules, meaning that it may show us how space rocks could have "seeded" life here on Earth in the first place. In BBC News, Doreen Walton quotes researcher Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin as saying, "Having this information means you can tell what was happening during the birth of the Solar System. Meteorites are like some kind of fossil. When you try to understand them you are looking back in time."

Anne Strieber thinks she has figured out WHO the Grays are, WHAT they are doing here and WHY. To access this information, enter the Subscriber section, click on the Audio Section then click on Special Interviews and scroll down until you see Special Interviews Archive, then click on that. The entire archive will open and you can scroll or do a browser search for the programming you are looking for. But first you need to subscribe today!

To learn more, click here and here.

NOTE: This news story, previously published on our old site, will have any links removed.


Subscribe to Unknowncountry sign up now