A genetic study of the world’s oldest anatomically-modern human, the body of a boy buried 24,000 years ago near Siberia’s Lake Baikal, has revealed that this individual was of European ancestry. This finding is surprising, in that Lake Baikal, the world’s largest freshwater lake, is situated north of modern-day Mongolia, a location quite far east on the Eurasian continent. What is even more surprising is that the DNA of this individual is also found in many Native Americans, half a world away.
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One of the notable aspects of climate change that has been observed is the further toward the poles one looks, the more pronounced global warming’s impact becomes. While the tropics have warmed somewhat, average temperatures in the Artic have soared: the North Pole was a full degree warmer than Seattle on Dec 30 2015, and while the contiguous U.S. broke a 3.3ºF (1.83ºC) above-average heat record for June of this year, Alaska saw a temperature record of nearly three times that level for the same month, at 9ºF (5.0ºC) above average.
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