We are currently living under very volatile skies. Less than one year after a 10,000 ton meteorite exploded above the Russian city of Chelyabinsk in the Urals injuring 950 people, Russian scientists reveal that a nearby area of the country narrowly missed an impact from a 15 meter asteroid which skimmed past Earth last weekend. The asteroid, which was moving at 16km per second, passed within 11,300km of the Earth’s surface, an altitude which is below the orbit of geostationary satellites. It was discovered during its near miss by the Master Tunka station near Lake Baikal. The asteroid was not previously known.
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Huge balls of fire are being seen in the skies of India, andthey aren’t asteroids or plane crashes. They are accompaniedby deafening explosions.

In one village, trees began swaying and dishes fell offshelves. People panicked and ran from their houses.Incredibly loud explosions were also heard, but so far,police have not been able to find the places where theexplosions are coming from.

The Hindustan Times reports that the fireballs have beenseen by thousands of people. One of them says he saw “a hugeball of fire” that caused all his pots and pans “to comecrashing down.” Officials deny that this is caused byearthquakes or a satellite crash.

How can we know what’s real?and what isn’t? Scientists arenow saying we shouldtrust ourvibes.
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It’s usually ice blocks that fall from the sky in Spain, but recently hundreds of witnesses there saw balls of fire in the sky. Authorities are searching for an estimated 50 tons of material from a meteorite which broke up after colliding with the Earth. A local official says, “I left the house at around 12 minutes to six. I heard a big explosion, like an earth tremor, and a white cloud of smoke formed around a nearby mountain which took a long time to disappear.” Another witness says, “There was a loud report, like an explosion. The windows shuddered and we were frightened.”
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The colorful Naga fireballs arrive in Laos every autumn, during the full moon at the end of Buddhist Lent. Local scientists think they know what causes the lights, but they don’t understand why they return at the same time every year.
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