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Sniffer Dogs Identify Anthrax Terrorist

Sniffer dogs trained to find anthrax and leads from FBI agents in Africa point to former government scientist Steven Hatfill as a possible suspect in the five anthrax deaths. Three bloodhounds from California were given the scent from the anthrax letters that were sent last year and each of them led handlers to Hatfill?s apartment. He commissioned a report three years ago on how to deal with an anthrax attack by mail, which says that a terrorist would use 2.5 grams of powder in a standard envelope, which is the same amount sent to Senator Patrick Leahy. However, Hatfill continues to deny any involvement, and says, "I have never, ever worked with anthrax in my life."

The FBI has also sent two teams of agents sent to Africa to investigate whether Hatfill worked with anthrax there in the late 1970s and 1980s, when he attended medical school in what is now Zimbabwe. Hatfill lived near a Greendale primary school in Africa, and Greendale School was the phony return address used in the anthrax letters. While he was there, the U.S. helped launch an attack on guerillas there, who were trying to gain independence. They eventually succeeded and the former English-controlled country of Rhodesia became Zimbabwe.

It turns out the anthrax attacks could have been worse. The anthrax on the letter sent to Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle has a brownish tint, and scientists say the water marks on the envelope indicate both the letter and the anthrax got wet, preventing much of the deadly anthrax from flying into the air when it was opened. Jerry Hauer, an expert on biological and chemical terrorism, says, "By having some water in there, it caked some of the anthrax and reduced the amount that could have been aerosolized."

Unknowncountry reported it first! Read our August 9 news story, ?Why We Don?t Arrest Anthrax Terrorist,?click here.

After a year, the FBI finally seems to be making some progress in the anthrax case. It turns out they ignored a recent warning about the D.C. sniper as well as the many warnings about 911. Are they as inefficient as they seem? Read ?The Bureau: The Secret History of the FBI? by Ronald Kessler,click here.

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