The International Space Station, with its two-man crew (one American, one Russian) is losing cabin pressure, meaning it may have sprung a leak after recently being hit by a piece of space junk. So far, there are no plans to abandon the ISS, since NASA says the leak is small and is “having no impact on station operations and the crew is in no danger.”
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There are plenty of people who dislike the traditional idea of being buried in a graveyard. They usually opt for cremation, and ask that their ashes be scattered in a particular place. Now they can be sent into space. And you can now send final emails to your friends after you’re dead.

In 1997, Celestis launched Timothy Leary’s ashes into space and in April, they are sending the remains of 150 others into space on the Russian Kosmos 1 satellite. The containers will orbit the Earth for approximately 156 years, then re-enter the atmosphere, burning up along the way. This costs between $1,000 and $5,000, depending on the amount of ashes contained in the capsule.
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Astronomers now think that life spread throughout the Milky Way via microbes hitching a ride on asteroids and comets, and that it didn’t originate on Earth. It will eventually leak out into other galaxies?if it hasn’t already. This means that life is probably widespread, although the planet(s) where life originated may now be barren or may never be identified. However, this doesn’t mean ET will look familiar, because evolution can take many twists and turns.
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Physicist Freeman Dyson says that our “scheme of Mars missions is excellent, but it has one fatal flaw: the fact that you are expecting NASA to do it.” NASA has become timid, after the recent shuttle disaster, but private companies are willing take over the task.

Sir Martin Rees, the British Royal Astronomer, thinks rich CEOs like Amazon.com’s Jeff Bezos will finance trips to the moon and Mars in the future, with NASA playing a supportive role. On space.com, Robert Roy Britt quotes him as saying, “I think the future of manned spaceflight will only brighten if it’s done by people prepared to cut costs and take risks in a fashion that’s seemingly unacceptable to the U.S. public in a NASA project.”
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