We’ve talked about space elevators, or cable cars, in the past. But they may only be able to be used by robots, because of the radiation surrounding the earth.

Kelly Young writes in New Scientist that space elevators could be a cheap way to get cargo and possibly people into space one day. This could be especially important if we establish colonies on the moon, or even on Mars. But there’s one problem: any human riding one of these through the Van Allen radiation belts that surround the earth would get a lethal dose of radiation. The reason that astronauts have not been injured in this way is because they traveled so quickly through this area, but a space elevator would be a much slower ride.

Art credit: gimp-savvy.com
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NASA says that the weather here on Earth has a surprising connection to space weather in the ionosphere, which is the electrically-charged upper atmosphere. As if emissions from greenhouse gases here on earth weren?t bad enough, satellites have discovered that Researchers discovered that tides of air generated by thunderstorm activity over South America, Africa and Southeast Asia is changing the structure of the ionosphere. Turbulence in the ionosphere can disrupt GPS positioning devices, as well as radio and cell phone signals.
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But what is it? – Astronomers tell us that the mysterious substance called dark matter is the main substance in the universe?but we just can?t find it. It’s the same sort of thing that quantum physicists say about parallel universes or “brane worlds” (worlds that contain a different number of dimensions from ours). Astronomers can detect the presence of dark matter by the way gravity behaves around it. Now they have new evidence that it really exists.
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One of the strangest plants on the planet Earth is called “slime mold,” a single-celled plant which normally lives on the moist forest floor that when under stress, builds a kind of “space ship” which it then launches away from the danger. We human beings may eventually have to do the same thing.

Usually the cells of Dictyostelium discoideum live separately. But when their food dries up, they band together and form a multi-cellular tower designed to save their children. Researcher Joe Noel wanted to figure out how they do it.
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