Despite the insistence of some physicists that quantum effects only affect things on an extremely small scale, new theories continue to be put forward that the smallest known processes may be responsible for some very, very big phenomena, ranging from things such as the navigational sense of migratory birds, to the potential that they may also be responsible for the very existence of life as we know it on Earth.
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 Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have developed a method of freezing and storing light, an important step on the road to developing quantum computers. Most switches used in quantum computing experiments are made up of trapped ions or semiconductor particles, suspended in a state of quantum superposition. Photons, however, could interface much more efficiently with fiber optic networks, without the need for a way to translate the information between the qubit — the quantum-computing equivalent of a classical computer bit — and the computer’s network or interface.
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The mainstream scientific community has long asserted that the strange effects of quantum physics, such as quantum indeterminacy and entanglement, can not assert themselves at the classical, or macroscopic, level of everyday physics. In recent years, quantum physicists have been steadily pushing the scale of what can be affected by quantum effects upward, suggesting that large-scale objects can affect, and in turn be affected by distant phenomenon.
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Of the four fundamental forces known to science in our culture, there are only three that can be manipulated: electromagnetic, strong nuclear, and weak nuclear. Eluding our grasp thus far is the ever-important force of gravity, forcing us to expend large amounts of energy to leave the planet’s surface. However, a revolutionary proposal has been made that may change that situation.
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