Brain implants that allow the direct interface between the human brain and machines have been in development for some time now. However, aside from the daunting task of figuring out how to couple solid-state electronics with what amounts to a biological computer, another problem faced by researchers is the body’s reaction to foreign objects: implanted electrodes work just fine when initially inserted, but over time scar tissue builds up over them, hampering their ability to both read and transmit electrical signals between themselves and their targeted neurons. However, researchers at Harvard Medical School have come up with a new method of implantation that may be able to avoid this problem, allowing for long-term use of such implants.
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Today the world is remembering the terrible events of thirteen years ago, when one of the world’s worst terrorist attacks destroyed the World Trade Center in New York. But for some people, the memories don’t just surface every year; they have to live with daily reminders that leave them living in a half-life of trauma and fear.
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Anne Strieber starts off this edition of our subscriber specials with a delightful story of the ghosts in her life, but then matters turn more serious when Dr. Botkin goes into detail about exactly what he thinks is happening when the IADC process induces the appearance of a dead person. Is this imaginary, imaginal or completely real? And if it is real, Whitley Strieber asks the question: where are the dead when they aren’t with us? You will be fascinated by Dr. Botkin’s answer and by this whole amazing field of IADC.
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The recent killing of Afghan civilians by an American soldier who undoubtedly had post traumatic stress disease–as well as the shooting of a black kid by a patrol officer here in the US–points out the need to identify soldiers and police who are vulnerable to PTSD BEFORE they are hired–but is this possible? It may be: scientists have identified specific genetic risks that make people more vulnerable to this condition.

Neuroscientist Joseph Boscarino says, "We found that individuals with these ‘at-risk’ genetic variants were more likely to develop PTSD, especially those that had higher exposure to traumatic events. Those without these four genetic variants appeared to be highly resilient to PTSD, regardless of trauma exposure history."
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