It’s sometimes easy to forget that as humans, we’re not the only technologically-capable species present on Earth at the moment: many of our animal brethren make and use tools to shape their immediate environment, such as birds building nests as structures to raise their young in, beavers building dams to flood areas for security from predators, prairie dogs possessing a language that contains a vocabulary of hundreds of words, and chimpanzees shaping sticks to dig and hunt for ants.
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A new archaeological discovery has been made, and as with the previous discovery of undiscovered chambers in the Bent Pyramid in Egypt, the key to making the find was found in the cosmos: this time, the connection was made by a high school student, using the stars to plot the locations of ancient Mayan cities.
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The mainstream scientific theory that North and South America’s indigenous cultures came across the Bering land bridge from Asia at the end of the last ice age appears to be in jeopardy, with the growing acceptance of archaeological finds across the two continents that point to a much earlier period of habitation. A recent paper published regarding an underwater sinkhole in Florida that contains human-made artifacts dating back to 14,550 years ago — over a thousand years before humans were even supposed to be in Alaska — is one such example, although the acceptance of these ideas has been slow.
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When it comes to mysterious prehistoric sites, North America’s rich treasure trove of ancient puzzles tend to get overshadowed by more famous examples from Africa, Eurasia, and South America. Earthworks like the Serpent Mound in Ohio, and numerous medicine wheel sites such as Wyoming’s Bighorn Medicine Wheel are but two types of these archaeological enigmas, who’s ages can be disputed due to the difficulty in determining how old the constructions are.
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