A study by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography shows that the underwater world is becoming a noisier place, with unknown effects on marine life. They?ve discovered that there has been a tenfold increase in the underwater ocean noise off Southern California?s coast in the last 40 years. This has to be having a bad effect on marine species, especially those?like whales and dolphins?that communicate with each other underwater.
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Modern human life is ruining our oceans. The “rise of slime” is causing the water to become more acidic, killing off many species, some of which may turn out to be essential to slowing down global warming. The runoff from modern life is causing a kind of reverse evolution, allowing ancient species of bacteria to flourish that haven’t been seen on earth for billions of years.

The legs of Australian fishermen are becoming covered with scars from brining up slimy weeds which they call “fireweed” in their nets. This fireweed begins growing on the floor of the Pacific ocean every spring and spreads so fast that it can cover an area the size of a football field in an hour. U.S. Scientists are worried that it may spread to U.S. waters soon.
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The legendary giant squid, which has only recently beendiscovered to be real, is being killed by all the noise inthe ocean. Unusually high numbers of them are washing up onSpanish beaches. Scientists think they’re being killed bythe loud, low frequency sounds made by oil drilling in theocean.

Scientists have never seen living giant squids in theirnatural habitat?they only know they exist because they?vefound dead specimens. Before that, these creatures werethought to be tall tales told by fishermen.

Debora MacKenzie writes in New Scientist that militaryexercises are also killing off marine life. In 2002, NATOexercises with high-intensity sonar were blamed for thelarge number of beached whales.
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Researchers are searching the ocean forDeadZones?areas with extremely low levels of oxygen that cannotsustain life. Last summer, a huge Dead Zone settled in onthe coast of Oregon, causing fish and crustaceans to die. Itdisappeared in the fall, but now it’s back. OceanologistJack Barth says, “What I think we are seeing is a tipping ofthe balance of the ecosystem. We don’t fully understand whatthe cause of that is.”
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