The plastic kind – Plastic pollution is a big problem in the ocean right now and we can’t wait until tomorrow to clean it up.

By dragging fine-meshed nets along the ocean’s surface, researchers found that while there is a great deal of it there, the volume seems to have stopped increasing, probably due to new laws that prohibit ships from dumping their trash in the ocean. Plastic, which does not dissolve, is still a major problem, though: They found pieces of it in 60% of the over 6,000 samples of trash they examined.
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Our oceans are in trouble. What happened in the past can affect the future. More than 200 million gallons of oil is estimated to have spilled into the Gulf after the April 20 blowout at BP’s Deepwater Horizon, an incident which also killed 11 people. While the surface of the Gulf now looks clean and most of the beaches have been cleared of oil as well, there’s still a lot of oil out there–The explosion left an oil slick on the ocean floor. Will this be a problem in the future?
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UPDATE: Lobsters too! – Since July, there have been a number of mysterious ocean kills reported from around the world, only one of which has been mentioned by the general media in the west. The kills involve a massive mollusk kill in Pakistan, seal mutilations in Great Britain and, most recently, a huge kill in Brazilian waters. On July 17, 2010, millions of dead and dying mollusks washed up along the Arabian Sea shore of Pakistan, and were videotaped on Clifton Beach in Karachi. On August 18, the British newspaper the Sun reported that over 60 seals have washed up on beaches in Norfolk and Scotland, all dead of an identical injury, a single deep cut from head to stomach. Most recently, a massive kill of alligators, fish and turtles has been reported in Brazilian waters.read more

In a recent study, a group of British researchers have proposed a new powerhouse of biofuel: the Gribble.

In case you aren’t familiar with the microscopic marine world, Gribble are actually tiny crustacean pests that can break down wood into sugars like no other species on Earth. Gribbles are generally considered to be the scourge of seafaring vessels – they can destroy wooden planks and piers much like termites can eat away at your home. However, they now might hold the key to future liquid biofuel processing plants.
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