Who uses home remedies?and do they work as well as something you can get from your doctor or the drugstore? While use of home remedies is common among people 65 and older, Blacks and Native Americans tend to make much greater use of them than Whites. A common mother’s home remedy for a tummy ache or nausea has long been a glass of ginger ale. It turns out mom was right.

The difference in who uses home remedies is NOT due to income or access to health care. Psychologist Joseph G. Grzywacz says, “Ethnic [and cutural] differences?may explain why black and Native American elders are more likely to use home remedies.”
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The FDA has warned cosmetics companies that their products contain a lot of potentially dangerous, untested ingredients. They’re especially worried that when we mix several of these ingredients together, such as put on lotion before putting on makeup, we may be mixing these chemicals together into a dangerous combination. Well, at least soap is safe (but not if it causes superbugs!)
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Newswise – While many of us turn to our chiropractor when we develop asore back, there has long been controversy about whether ornot chiropractic techniques really ?work.? Some doctors sendtheir patients to chiropractors, while others thinkchiropractors are out of date practitioners of a type oftreatment that has long been superceded by more modern drugsand surgery. But there is a growing body of evidence thatgoing to the chiropractor can reduce your other health carecosts.

In a study published in the Journal of Vertebral SubluxationResearch, researchers found that chiropractic care caninfluence DNA repair. These findings offer a scientificexplanation for the positive health benefits reported bypatients who regularly visit chiropractors.
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From the Middle Ages to the 19th century, bloodletting?bycutting or using leeches?was one of the major “cures” usedby doctors. It was abandoned in the mid-20th century afterantibiotics were invented. It seems primitive and dangerousto us today, but scientists have found that there was areason behind it.

Microbiologist Eric P. Skaar has discovered that the staphgerm, a leading cause of infections, fuels itself with iron.Removing red blood cells from the body removes the iron thisbacteria feeds on.

Iron specialist Tracy Rouault says, “How could a procedurepopular for 2,500 years have really been completely worthless?”
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