Despite recent sightings of a giant, elusive reptile living in a creek in South Dakota, a search has so far turned up nothing. Between July 24 and July 26 this summer, Shirley Nikodym and Chris Heinz were walking along Moccasin Creek when they saw what appeared to be a large snake poke its head out of the water. The snake ducked back under and began swimming toward the shore, causing them to run away.

Animal control officer John Weaver searched the area but saw no sign of the snake. The huge ball python that Nikodym and Heinz described to him is a tropical snake that needs hot weather. Weaver says it couldn?t survive a South Dakota winter, and probably won?t live through September.
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An Italian geologist maintains that the fabled monster of Loch Ness is nothing more than hot volcanic air, and he has sent ripples around the shores of the deep lake in order to test his theory. Luigi Piccardi, a seismologist from Florence, says the legend of Nessie, which dates back nearly 1,500 years, could be the result of a major geological fault that runs beneath the lake?s dark waters.

The Great Glen Fault, which runs the entire length of Britain?s largest lake, in the heart of the Scottish Highlands, is one of the country?s few still active volcanic areas. Piccardi says that it is bound to have produced sinister rumblings and hot bubbles of gas over the centuries, giving birth to stories of monsters living in its depths.
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