Alaska has its own Loch Ness Monster. It’s been seen in Cadboro Bay, and has been tentatively identified as a Cadborosaurus, a carnivorous marine reptile that lived during the dinosaur era and was thought to have gone extinct at the end of the Cretaceous Era, millions of years ago. Scotland’s Nessie has also been identified as a dinosaur–could these creatures be the last remnants of an ancient era?
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They’ve glimpsed her on Google, and now ANOTHER "Nessie" has had her photo taken! A kayaker on England’s Lake Windemere has taken an excellent photograph of the English Loch Ness Monster known to locals as "Bownessie." The strange humpbacked creature has been reported by witnesses eight times in the past 5 years, but this is the first clear photograph. The creature was moving very fast, at an estimated 10 miles an hour, the humps on its back undulating. Its skin appeared like that of a seal.read more

No, we’re not dreaming! Jason Cooke was surfing through Google Earth when he decided to look at a satellite photo of Loch Ness in Scotland, and spotted an image which may be the Loch Ness monster.

In the August 27th edition of the Guardian newspaper, Stephen Moss quotes Nessieologist Cameron McSporran as saying, “It’s a dramatic and compelling image. It is probably the most important sighting since 1974, when campers at the Loch Ness caravan park saw a vast green scaly creature with a curved head and a long, slender body at four in the morning. It requires a great deal of detailed analysis and close consultation with the Highlands and Islands Tourist Board, but I think at last we are close to silencing the doubters.”
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There is new evidence in the search for the Loch Ness Monster. A fossil of a giant “sea monster” has been discovered on an Arctic island. This doesn’t explain how it might have gotten to Scotland, but it does show that such creatures did once exist.

In BBC News, Paul Rincon quotes Paleontologist Angela Milner as saying, “One hundred and fifty million years ago, Svalbard [the island on which the fossils were discovered] was not so near the North Pole, there was no ice cap and the climate was much warmer than it is today.”
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