Another potential sighting of the legendary Loch Ness Monster has been made, the fourteenth such sighting of the elusive ‘Nessie’ made this year alone. This new sighting is somewhat more unusual than earlier claims, in that it was made from nearly 10,000 kilometers (6,200 miles) away, by an amateur monsterread more

We all love a good monster movie, don’t we, even if it’s viewed with just one eye open from behind the safety of our sofas?

Year after year, Hollywood favourites such as Count Dracula and the Wolfman, and other classic fiendish figures continue to draw crowds of eager horror-movie-lovers. But when and where did our preoccupation with the "bogeyman" arise? Is there any basis in truth to the stories of mythical monsters?

Greg McDonald, director of forensic medicine at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, says that like many myths and scary stories, both Dracula and the Wolfman stemmed from a poor understanding of medical maladies.

The Loch Ness Monster is one of the most enduring legends of Scotland, bringing thousands of visitors to the country each year. A strange fate may have befallen our favourite cryptid, however, as there have not been any sightings of her since 2012.

It is claimed that one of the first recorded sightings of "Nessie," as the monster is affectionately known, was made by St. Columba in A.D. 565 when the saint scared away a huge aquatic beast that was preparing to attack a man in the Ness River, which flows into the lake. This tale has been thought by many, however, to be an allegorical story depicting the power of God overcoming the evil of Satan.