The earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in March damaged several of their power plants, releasing large amounts of radioactive material into the water and into the soil around the Fukushima reactor. Now a group of citizens have started a campaign to plant sunflowers in order to clean contaminants from the fallout zone.
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Scientific experts believe Japan’s nuclear disaster, which started with an earthquake on March 11, which caused a tsunami that destroyed the cooling systems at the Tokyo Electric Power Company’s (TEPCO) nuclear plant in Fukushima, is far worse than the government is revealing.
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The recent Japanese nuclear power plant meltdown has spurred scientists on to find better ways to detect radiation. They could also use these methods to search for countries (like Iran) that are secretly making nuclear weapons–as well as terrorists who want to use "dirty bombs." The International Atomic Energy Agency mandates nuclear safeguard systems to on these reactors, but one thing they DON’T show is how much plutonium or uranium is present in the fuel rods of these reactors, some of which could be diverted to use for manufacturing weapons. With nuclear reactors supplying large amounts of the power used on this planet–especially in Europe–this is not a small problem. read more

The French research group on radioactivity CRIIRAD is warning that the risks associated with iodine-131 contamination in Europe from the Japanese nuclear power plant meltdowns are no longer "negligible," and are advising pregnant women and infants against not to drink fresh milk or eat leafy vegetables. Should we be cautious here in the US as well?
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