It?s something so large, it can be seen from space: amassive iceberg is colliding with a floating glacier nearthe McMurdo Research Station in Antarctica. NASA satellitesare following the 100-mile-long B-15A iceberg as it movessteadily towards the Drygalski Ice Tongue. They expect acollision no later than January 15, 2005.

When the iceberg and the ice tongue collide, the edges ofeach could crumple and ice could pile up or drift into theRoss Sea. If the B-15A iceberg picks up enough speed beforeit collides with the ice tongue, the Drygalski Ice Tonguecould break off. The ice tongue is thick ice that grows outover the Ross Sea from a land-based glacier on Antarctica’sScott Coast.
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The National Ice Center reports that another new iceberg has broken away from Antarctica. An iceberg the size of St. Lucia Island in the Caribbean Sea broke off from the Lazarev Ice Shelf, a large sheet of glacial ice and snow extending from the Antarctic mainland into the southeastern Weddell Sea.

The new iceberg, D-17, is 34.5 miles long and 6.9 miles wide. It was observed on an image collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. Icebergs are named for the area quadrant of Antarctica where they appear. D-17 is the 17th berg reported since record keeping began in 1976.
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A rectangular iceberg more than twice the size of Manhattan broke off from an Antarctic glacier this week, adding to the already high number of giant icebergs floating in southern waters. The 58-square-mile iceberg C-17 broke loose from the Matusevich Glacier in the Ross Sea. Antarctic researchers have noted an increase in the number of massive icebergs calved from the continent in recent years, an indication of global warming.
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