The term "global warming" has been described as one of the most misleading descriptions of the modern world by president of the Space and Science Research Corporation, John L. Casey, in his new book, "Dark Winter: How The Sun Is Causing a 30-Year Cold Spell."

Casey claimed in a recent interview that the increase in global temperatures has now ceased, and has replaced by a period of icy cold that could prevail for another thirty years, with catastrophic effects on agriculture and farming.
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As if we needed any more factors to influence our already unpredictable weather, scientists are now concerned about the lack of activity on the sun, which appears to have diminished significantly.

The periodic changes in the sun’s activity, such as changes in levels of solar radiation, coronal mass ejections and solar flares, are known as the solar magnetic activity cycle. These variations, which can affect space weather and the Earth’s climate, have been noted to occur in eleven year cycles for hundreds of years. At this point in the cycle there should be a solar maximum, but space physicists have revealed that,conversely, activity is worryingly low.
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Many vertebrate species (that category includes us) would have to evolve about 10,000 times faster than they have in the past to adapt to the rapid climate change expected in the next 100 years.

Scientists analyzed how quickly species adapted to different climates in the past, using data from 540 living species from all major groups of terrestrial vertebrates, including amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. They then compared their rates of evolution to rates of climate change projected for the end of this century.
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While most of the world is experiencing global warming, Alaska seems to be entering another ice age. Since 2000, temperatures in Alaska have dropped by 2.4 degrees Fahrenheit. When scientists looked at weather reports from 20 climate stations in that state that are operated by the National Weather Service, 19 of the 20 of them reported FALLING temperatures.
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