About twice as many Atlantic hurricanes form each year on average than a century ago, but so we don’t repeat the mistakes of Katrina, when weak levees broke, scientists have developed “instant dams” that can be dropped from the air.

A new study concludes that warmer sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and altered wind patterns associated with global climate change are fueling much of the increase. Researcher Greg Holland says, “These numbers are a strong indication that climate change is a major factor in the increasing number of Atlantic hurricanes.”
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An extremely powerful cyclone, the equivalent of the most powerful hurricane, is hitting Oman in the Indian Ocean. The highly unusual storm has sustained winds of 160 MPH, and has developed because, like most ocean areas, the Indian Ocean is experiencing higher than normal water temperatures. The BBC news quotes one resident as saying, “I have lived in Oman for nearly 10 years and I have never experienced something like this.” Tropical Storm Gonu is heading toward Oman’s east coast, and residents of outlying islands are being evacuated. The storm is expected to strike Oman, then cross the gulf to Iran. It is the strongest storm to hit the Arabian Peninsula since record keeping began in 1945.read more

El Nino may save us from hurricanes caused by global warming in the near future, since An El Nino is an extreme warming of the ocean waters in the Pacific that affects weather conditions worldwide. NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association) reports that the current, weak El Nino will last into 2007. This has already helped to mitigate the effects of climate change and make the Atlantic hurricane season milder than expected. Just like the sun, El Nino may be giving us a reprieve. The question is, will we use this time productively?
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Meteorologists are trying come up with ways to calm down hurricanes. One method would be to blast them with a nuclear weapon. “The answer to that is a hurricane is bad enough without making it radioactive,” says Hugh Willoughby, of the International Hurricane Center. “The only benefit would be is it would glow in the dark and it would be a lot easier to see at night.” But Peter Cordani of Dyn-O-Mat, who invented an absorbent powder that can make a thundercloud release rain, thinks he can solve the hurricane problem too.
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