A record-breaking heat wave is currently gripping India, killing hundreds, with temperatures hot enough to liquefy asphalt.

"As of now, we don’t predict any respite from the extreme heatwave for the next few days," reports a spokesman from India’s Meteorological Department, B. P. Yadav. They expect to see temperatures in excess of 45 degrees Celsius (113 Fahrenheit) over the next few days, and have issued multiple heat warnings to the affected states.
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An Unknowncountry.com reader reports from Shanghai, "It is hell here. It is far worse than they are saying. The heat is unbelievable, the streets are melting." He goes on to say that the hospitals are clogged and the government is not admitting the truth of just how many people are being affected by Shanghai’s worst heat wave in the 140 years that temperature records have been kept in the city.

Shanghai’s extreme heat wave joins dozens of other weather extremes, ranging from violent storms to flooding to heat waves and drought from around the world that have characterized Earth’s climate in 2013. Today’s temperature in Shanghai reached 105.4F, and it is expected to reach 106. Meteorologists anticipate that a cooling trend will set in later in the month.
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A heat wave that has broken records across the western United States is expected to worsen over the next few days. Temperatures have broken records across much of the western half of the country, with a high of 115 in Las Vegas and 119 in Phoenix on Saturday. San Antonio, Texas reached 108, a record for that city. Death Valley temperatures hovered around 124. The highest temperature ever recorded on Earth was 134, recorded in July of 1913 in Death Valley.
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Despite the fact that the brutal summer of 2003 brought withit the highest weather-related death toll in Europeanhistory, the catastrophe was largely ignored by the USmedia. Estimates of the dead range from 22,000 to 35,000,and now a scientific group is warning that such summerscould become the norm, and not just in Europe.

Until now, it has been impossible to tell the degree towhich heat generated by human activity has been responsible,as opposed to natural weather processes. However, PeterStott, of the UK Meterological Office’s Hadley Centre, andDaithi Stone and Myles Allen, of Oxford University have beenable, using extremely detailed data from thousands ofdifferent temperature sensors located across Europe, todetermine this, and their findings are sobering.
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