Keeping in step with the record-breaking high temperatures that were experienced over the holidays, and over 2015 for that matter, the North Pole also saw unseasonably warm weather — with one projection showing the temperature going above freezing for six hours.

The same warming trend in Atlantic and Pacific waters that contributed to massive storm systems across eastern regions of North America and in northern Europe also pushed temperatures at the North Pole to the freezing mark, with Environment Canada reporting that an ocean buoy near the pole registered a temperature of 0ºC (32ºF) on Dec. 30. Seattle, a city with mild winter temperatures, was actually colder on the same day, at -1ºC (30ºF).
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A recent study has indicated that the Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland is experiencing a rapid melt that threatens to raise sea levels by up to one centimeter.

The glacier, which is thought to have yielded the iceberg that ended the Titanic’s fated voyage, has begun to melt at an alarming rate, about four times faster than it was reducing in the 1990s. This puts it at the top of the glacier-melting charts, making it the fastest flowing river of ice in the world.

The recent research project, published in the Cryosphere journal, examined images from the German TerraSAR-X satellites to monitor the speed of the glacier.
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They release GERMS! – Those pristine-looking Alpine glaciers now melting as global warming sets in may explain the mysterious increase in persistent organic pollutants in sediment from certain lakes since the 1990s, despite decreased use of those compounds in pesticides, electric equipment, paints and other products. Could this become dangerous in the future that may on the way?
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A new study shows that glaciers in Alaska are melting evenfaster than we thought. Anthony Arendt of the University ofAlaska used laser altimetry to measure the changes in volumeof 67 Alaskanglaciers over four decades. “Glaciers in Alaska seem to bethinning from the mid-1950s to the mid-1990s,” he says. Therate of thinning doubled between the mid-1990s and 2001.

“We know that the climate has had to change for that tohappen,” Arendt says. “Whether or not these changes inclimate are due to human influences, that?s not for us tosay, but it?s possible that it is linked to a larger-scalechange in global climate caused by human activity.”
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