An archaeological expedition aimed at plumbing the secrets of Chichen Itza’s underworld of the gods has uncovered the well-preserved remains of ancient humans and extinct animals that date back to the last ice age–far more than what the expedition’s members bargained for when they set out to map and explore the sacred network of Mayan caves. The nature of some of the fossils found there also hinted at the occurrence of a "catastrophic event" that embedded some of the bones in the walls of the cave.
read more

The evidence pointing toward a major cometary impact that heralded the closure of the last ice age 13,000 years ago is steadily growing, with a new study from the University of Kansas offering more data that supports what is known as the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis.

"The hypothesis is that a large comet fragmented and the chunks impacted the Earth, causing this disaster," explains University of Kansas Emeritus Professor of Physics & Astronomy Adrian Melott. "A number of different chemical signatures–carbon dioxide, nitrate, ammonia and others–all seem to indicate that an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth’s land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers [3,9 million square miles], was consumed by fires."
read more

The phenomenon of mysterious booms is continuing around the world, with the sound of unexplained explosions being reported from locales as diverse as Michigan, Lapland, St Ives, Swansea and Yorkshire.

Booms reported by residents of six counties in Alabama have been investigated by police, NASA, and the Birmingham Alabama National Weather Service, with the latter tweeting on November 14:

"Re: loud boom heard: we do not see anything indicating large fire/smoke on radar or satellite; nothing on USGS indicating an earthquake. We don’t have an answer, and can only hypothesize with you. 1) sonic boom from aircraft; 2) meteorite w/ current Leonid shower?"
read more

The revised dating and uncovering of new artifacts from an archaeological site in Australia’s Arnhem Land has prompted archaeologists to revise theories as to when the ancestors of present-day Aboriginies first settled in what we now call Australia, pushing that date back by 20,000 years to a point in time 65,000 years ago. This revised timeline also implies that modern humans may have begun the colonization of Asia much earlier than previously assumed.
read more