2019 is now officially the second warmest year on record, according to a joint press release from NASA and NOAA, with 2016 still holding the dubious distinction of being at the top of the global warming thermometer. Unfortunately, because the planet has seen consistent year-over-year temperature increases, the 2010s areread more

A new study of seashells excavated from ancient glacial deposits in Scotland indicate that the region’s glaciers melted over a relatively short period of time–a period spanning only a few decades, and possibly as short as a matter of years–illustrating the abruptness of past climate change events, and how those events could serve as a warning as to how quickly our modern environment could also take an abrupt turn.
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An archaeological expedition aimed at plumbing the secrets of Chichen Itza’s underworld of the gods has uncovered the well-preserved remains of ancient humans and extinct animals that date back to the last ice age–far more than what the expedition’s members bargained for when they set out to map and explore the sacred network of Mayan caves. The nature of some of the fossils found there also hinted at the occurrence of a "catastrophic event" that embedded some of the bones in the walls of the cave.
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The evidence pointing toward a major cometary impact that heralded the closure of the last ice age 13,000 years ago is steadily growing, with a new study from the University of Kansas offering more data that supports what is known as the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis.

"The hypothesis is that a large comet fragmented and the chunks impacted the Earth, causing this disaster," explains University of Kansas Emeritus Professor of Physics & Astronomy Adrian Melott. "A number of different chemical signatures–carbon dioxide, nitrate, ammonia and others–all seem to indicate that an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth’s land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers [3,9 million square miles], was consumed by fires."
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