NOAA has announced that warming is being observed over the Tropical Pacific, which could lead to an El Nino by early spring. The U.S. is not expected to see the impact until late summer, and they will last through the fall and into next winter.

NOAA cautions that it?s too early to predict the magnitude of the 2002 El Ni?o, or how long it will last. ?The magnitude of an El Ni?o determines the severity of its impacts,? says Vernon Kousky, NOAA climate specialist. ?At this point, it is too early to predict if this El Ni?o might develop along the same lines as the 1997-98 episode, or be weaker.?
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An ancient coral reef in Papua New Guinea reveals that El Ninos and La Ninas, the pulses of warm and cold water in thePacific that cause extreme weather patterns such as droughts, floods and storms, have never been stronger than they are today.

So far, scientists have been unable to predict future El Ninos, meaning that they cannot prepare for weather emergencies. El Nino, the giant patch of unusually warm water, can disrupt fishing, produce rough weather on the West Coast of the U.S., and cause droughts in places like Indonesia. La Nina, which produces cold water, causes the terrible winter storms that batter the Northwest and the hot, dry summers of the Southwest.
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In a recent press release, Michael Mandeville, author of the Phoenix Trilogyabout the prophecies of Edgar Cayce, said that he has found a strongcorrelation between the outbreak of an El Nino and the location of the poleas the earth rocks back and forth in its annual orbit. This earth movementis known as Chandler’s Wobble. The cause of these large areas of warming inthe central Pacific, that effect weather patterns in North America, has longpuzzled scientists. Mandeville poured over graphs that plotted weatherpatterns for the past 100 years and has discovered that the onset of thenext El Nino can be predicted several months in advance at least seven outof eight times.
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