One of the more positive aspects of the development of brain-machine interfaces — the technology of linking mind and mechanism — is the promise of allowing paralyzed individuals to regain their mobility through controlling machines via their thoughts. While there has been a great deal of progress in this field over the last few years, one program appears to have had an unexpected effect on the subjects involved, where the individuals were able to regain sensation in, and control of, their paralyzed limbs after learning to use the equipment.

From the first few months after his startling recollection of the ordeal related in his book Communion, to the beginning of 1999, Whitley Strieber has been subjected to a battery of psychological and polygraphic tests. The result: he’s telling the truth. Whereas the body of professional documentation presented here represents onlyread more