It’s pretty clear by now that drought is in our future. The percent of land area experiencing exceptional drought reached record levels in August in three U.S. states–Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas–amid new concerns about how long the conditions may persist. A record of over 81% of Texas was facing exceptional drought as of August 31. Almost half the country is experiencing drought. There may not be many more crop circles in our future (you can get $3 off our beautiful new crop circle calendar by using coupon 2012 by Friday, September 23).
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Texas is home to presidential candidate Rick Perry, who denies global warming, but parts of the state are burning, due to a drought of historic proportions that has been intensified by excessive atmospheric heating predicted in global warming models. It is drier in Texas right now than it has been since the state began recording weather conditions and the result is predictable: fire. Previously, the six-year drought of the 1950s was the worst in Texas history, but it did not approach the extreme conditions being experienced now.
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Due to Hurricane Irene, we’re mostly hearing about flooding in the US at the moment, but there is a drought of historic proportions going on in Texas right now. Climate change will lead to even more weather extremes in the future.
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Despite the severe storms now raging across the country, the long term future will be a drier one. The long lull in sunspot activity at the end of the last 11-year solar cycle gave us more time to work on solving the climate change problem, but a new analysis of the magnitude of climate change during Earth’s deep past suggests that future temperatures may eventually rise far more than projected if society continues its pace of emitting greenhouse gases.read more