Recent DNA testing has been conducted on a set of ancient elongated Peruvian skulls that have baffled researchers for decades, due to their unusual shape and size. While the DNA testing is not complete, the results seem to indicate that the individuals they originally belonged to were not human.
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It has been generally accepted in many areas of the scientific community that the Shroud of Turin was created in Italy and is of European origin, but new DNA evidence shows that it was in areas that the historical record has always suggested.

The Shroud has recently had samples of particles taken from the artifact undergo DNA testing, to determine what peoples and plants were represented by the debris that have been deposited on it over the centuries.

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Everywhere we go, we leave little traces of ourselves behind. The strand of hair, the wad of gum, the cigarette butt, nail clipping, or puddle of spittle. And all of these negligible bits and pieces that we so casually or unknowingly discard, contain our genetic information.

Doctoral student Heather Dewey-Hagborg, who is completing her degree in electronic art at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, wanted to find out just how much of ourselves we are potentially revealing through this personal debris. So she began collecting these nasty little leave-behinds, and found that, “the more I walked around the city, the more I saw these genetic artifacts everywhere I looked.”
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You can choose your friends but not your family, so the old saying goes. But do we really choose them, or are we genetically pre-disposed to connect with the people in our friendship groups?

People who like to consider their close friends as family may not be too far wrong, according to a new study from the University of California, San Diego, and Yale University. The research project discovered that friends who do not appear to be biologically related often still resemble each other genetically.
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