When time slip expert Starfire Tor joined Whitley on Coast to Coast AM on January 9, one of her predictions for 2011 was more meteor strikes. Her prediction has come true already: In Oklahoma, people recently star a "big ball of fire" streaking across the sky. It glowed slightly green, probably because it contained copper. The meteor was also seen in Mississippi and Florida.
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A comet even brighter than Hale-Bopp was in 1995 can now be seen in the night sky. Comet McNaught became visible on January 12 and can be seen through Monday, January 15.

Chinaview.cn reports that McNaught is the brightest comet in 30 years. The comet, which has the official name of C/2006 P1, was discovered by Australian astronomer Robert McNaught on August 7th. It can currently be seen in both the morning and the evening, visible very low near the east-southeast horizon about 30 to 40 minutes before sunrise and very low near the west-southwest horizon about 30 to 40 minutes after sunset.
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On Monday, Comet 73P/Schwassmann Wachmann 3 broke in two, and now it is breaking up into smaller pieces as it headstoward the sun. There have been recent internet predictionsthat a large fragment of this comet would strike the earthon May 25, but in a new UPDATE, NASA says this will NOThappen. However, it is possible that meteor showers couldresult if earth passes through the dust cloud surroundingthe comet.
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Scientists now warn that with even the most sophisticatedastronomical scanning technology, dangerous meteorites arebeing missed and could possibly hit the earth with no warning. Professor Wickramasinghe of the Cardiff University?s centerfor Astrobiology claims that we can no longer assume that wehave decades or even years of warning for certain spaceobjects that are ?invisible? to current tracking methods.

Certain inactive comets may be covered with a type oforganic material that is loose and dispersed making itnon-reflective and thus impossible to detect. Because ofthis vulnerability, Professor Wickramasinghe suggests thatcurrent protocol for tracking objects threatening to earthneeds to be rethought to take into account ?invisible? comets.
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