Thanks to pollution, our days will be getting longer in the future. We could be slowing down the rotation of the Earth by steadily releasing more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, according to a team of Belgian researchers. They used climate models to simulate a 1 percent increase in the primary greenhouse gas each year, a rise they said goes along with current trends, and found that there will be a shift in the Earth?s spin over the course of the next few decades.

?The Earth?s rotation is an interesting quantity as it is global. Meteorological data are mainly local,? says Michel Crucifix. ?Consequently, the Earth rotation is a useful tool for looking?at the effects of global climate change.?
read more

NASA researchers have found that more sunlight entered the tropics and more heat escaped into space in the 1990s than in the 1980s, meaning there was less cloud cover to block incoming radiation or to stop the heat from escaping into the atmosphere. They determined this after examining 22 years of satellite measurements.

?Since clouds were thought to be the weakest link in predicting future climate change from greenhouse gases, these new results are unsettling,? says Dr. Bruce Wielicki of NASA. ?It suggests that current climate models may, in fact, be more uncertain than we had thought. Climate change might be either larger or smaller than the current range of predictions.?
read more

A new NASA study shows that the rate of growth of greenhouse gas emissions has slowed since its peak in 1980, due to reduced chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) use, slower growth of methane, and a steady rate of carbon dioxide emissions. Overall, the growth of emissions has slowed over the past 20 years, with the lower CFC the most important factor.

?The decrease is due in large part to cooperative international actions of the Montreal Protocol for the phase-out of ozone-depleting gases,? says James Hansen of NASA?s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. ?But it is also due in part to slower growth of methane and carbon dioxide, for reasons that aren?t well understood and need more study.?
read more

Countries around the world are trying to cope with climatic catastrophe, as a big freeze chills Europe and North America, Brazil recovers from torrential rains, bushfires blaze in an Australian heatwave and Saudis pray for rain. North America was plunged into an intense cold front that buried Buffalo and sent 3 feet of snow to New York.

In Europe, the chill has claimed hundreds of lives. A winter cold snap in Poland has killed 178 people since October, well above the 112 killed by the cold last year. Authorities in Bulgaria declared a state of emergency after the worst snowfalls in 30 years. Moscow authorities said three people died in the sub-zero temperatures, bringing to 250 the number to perish in the city?s chill this winter.
read more