UPDATE: Jupiter has NEW red spot & frost melting on Pluto – Earth is not the only planet in this solar system that is experiencing increased heating and weather upheavals. Increased turbulence and storms were first seen on Jupiter over two years ago, and are continuing. Periods of heating have also been noted on Mars from time to time in the past few years, and NASA astronomer Imke de Pater call the Jovian observations a “major upheaval” that involves stunning changes in the planet’s atmosphere. The planet’s temperatures may be increasing by 15 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Also, frost has been spotted varporizing on Pluto. Frost was seen on the planet in the 1930s, when Pluto was first discovered. Keep reading for update.
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According to a leading medical journal, climate change will have a huge impact on human health and bold decisions are needed now to protect the world’s population.

Writing in the British Medical Journal, Professor McMichael says that the risks to health are many, and include the impact of heat waves, floods and wildfires, changes in infectious disease patterns, the effect of worsening food yields and loss of livelihoods. He says, “Climate change is beginning to damage our natural life-support system.”
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Climate change could cause severe crop losses in South Asia and southern Africa over the next 20 years, because these countries could lose more than a third of their main crop, which is corn, due to heat and drought?or floods. The Israelis, who have experience growing crops in the desert, have developed a way to help plants adapt to the harsh conditions caused by global warming.
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A surge of Antarctic glaciers into the oceans could cause a dramatic rise in sea levels, and an area of the continent the size of Texas could be about to do just that. This area is known to be the least stable in the Antarctic.

The largest of the glaciers, the Pine Island Glacier, seems to be the least stable. It is now dropping more ice into the ocean than any other glacier in Antarctica. The ice is over a mile deep, twenty miles wide and is moving into the ocean at two miles a year.
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